Australian Football League

Australian rules football:

Australian Football League ‘Football brings together people from all cultural backgrounds andall walks of life. Everyone is equal – united by their love of the game’.1 Australian football is a strange paradox – for a game that is played almost exclusively in one part of the globe it is able to transcend cultural barriers and ethnic divides andbring communities together.
Australian Football League (AFL) CEO Andrew Demetriou said: “The game invites us allto be involved. We estimate we have more than 20 nationalities represented on our currentplaying lists and we are certain that this will continue to rise into the future as we welcomemore people from more communities to the AFL.”
The fact is more people are flocking to participate in Australian football than any otherfootball code in Australia.
A total of 539,526 registered participants played football in 2005 (a4.6 % rise from 2004), and membership of the 16 AFL clubs reached a record 506,509 in 2005,the first time the 500,000 mark has been surpassed.3Spectator support at games is also at record highs – the attendance record for the ToyotaAFL premiership season of 6.28 million was set in 2005, up six per cent on 2004 figures.In addition, total attendances for the Wizard Home Loans Cup, Toyota AFL premiershipseason and Toyota AFL finals series passed seven million for the first time.4On average, 4.02 million people watched AFL matches on television in 2005 (up 1.2 percent on 2004), and the 2005 AFL grand final between the Sydney Swans and the West CoastEagles was the most-watched television program in Australia that year, with an averageaudience in the five mainland capital cities of 3.386 million people.5Like the spectacular marks which signify the game – Australian football is flying high

The Aboriginal game

Australian football and our nation’s first inhabitants share a rich intertwined history. In fact,many believe that the sport was developed from an Aboriginal game called marngrook.
One of the purported founders of the game, Tom Wills, had a close relationship withIndigenous Australia – he spoke the language of the people with whom he grew up, theTjapwurrung, he knew some of their dances, and the first games he played were with localAboriginal children. It is also well documented that the Tjapwurrung played the Aboriginalfootball game marngrook.
The first football club, Melbourne, was formed on August 7, 1858 – the year of the code’s firstrecorded match between Scotch College and Melbourne Grammar School.

Australian Football League

The AFL is the peak body responsible for managing and administering Australian rulesfootball. Its mission is to actively support all levels of football from juniors to the elite level.Operating as a non-profit organisation, it distributes the great proportion of its operatingsurplus – after administration and game development costs – to its constituent clubs.
The national body supports seven state and territory football bodies, 94 regional offices, 180community football staff, over 2,400 AFL Auskick centres, 2,589 clubs fielding some 11,500teams each week, 20,000 coaches and 9,200 umpires.10 National objectives and strategies aredelivered by the state bodies and adapted to meet local needs

Australian rules football:

Australian Football League ‘Football brings together people from all cultural backgrounds andall walks of life. Everyone is equal – united by their love of the game’.1 Australian football is a strange paradox – for a game that is played almost exclusively in one part of the globe it is able to transcend cultural barriers and ethnic divides andbring communities together.

Australian Football League (AFL) CEO Andrew Demetriou said: “The game invites us allto be involved. We estimate we have more than 20 nationalities represented on our currentplaying lists and we are certain that this will continue to rise into the future as we welcomemore people from more communities to the AFL.”2The fact is more people are flocking to participate in Australian football than any otherfootball code in Australia.

A total of 539,526 registered participants played football in 2005 (a4.6 % rise from 2004), and membership of the 16 AFL clubs reached a record 506,509 in 2005,the first time the 500,000 mark has been surpassed.3Spectator support at games is also at record highs – the attendance record for the ToyotaAFL premiership season of 6.28 million was set in 2005, up six per cent on 2004 figures.In addition, total attendances for the Wizard Home Loans Cup, Toyota AFL premiershipseason and Toyota AFL finals series passed seven million for the first time.4On average, 4.02 million people watched AFL matches on television in 2005 (up 1.2 percent on 2004), and the 2005 AFL grand final between the Sydney Swans and the West CoastEagles was the most-watched television program in Australia that year, with an averageaudience in the five mainland capital cities of 3.386 million people.5Like the spectacular marks which signify the game – Australian football is flying high
The Aboriginal game
Australian football and our nation’s first inhabitants share a rich intertwined history. In fact,many believe that the sport was developed from an Aboriginal game called marngrook.
One of the purported founders of the game, Tom Wills, had a close relationship withIndigenous Australia – he spoke the language of the people with whom he grew up, theTjapwurrung, he knew some of their dances, and the first games he played were with localAboriginal children. It is also well documented that the Tjapwurrung played the Aboriginalfootball game marngrook.
The first football club, Melbourne, was formed on August 7, 1858 – the year of the code’s firstrecorded match between Scotch College and Melbourne Grammar School.
Australian Football League

The AFL is the peak body responsible for managing and administering Australian rulesfootball. Its mission is to actively support all levels of football from juniors to the elite level.Operating as a non-profit organisation, it distributes the great proportion of its operatingsurplus – after administration and game development costs – to its constituent clubs.

The national body supports seven state and territory football bodies, 94 regional offices, 180community football staff, over 2,400 AFL Auskick centres, 2,589 clubs fielding some 11,500teams each week, 20,000 coaches and 9,200 umpires.10 National objectives and strategies aredelivered by the state bodies and adapted to meet local needs

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